Madison

PEOPLE

U.S. Rimmer

U.S. Rimmer was the first Black elected to a judgeship in Beat 5, Madison County.

Sources:

Brown-Wright, Flonzie. Looking Back to Move Ahead Germantown, OH: FBW, 1994.

Cheeks-Collins, Jennifer E. Black America Series: Madison County, Mississippi Charleston: Arcadia, 2002.

Townsend Davis, Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Mead, Carol Lynn. The Land Between Two Rivers: Madison County, Mississippi. Canton, MS: Friends of the Madison County—Canton Public Library, 1987.

Orr-Klopfer, M. Susan. Where Rebels Roost : Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited. (self-published) 2005.

Payne, Charles M. I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

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PLACES

Rosa Scott School

This school was named after Rosa Allie Scott, who was an advocate for civil and human rights. She is buried on the school grounds. The school is located on Crawford Street in Madison.

Sources:

Brown-Wright, Flonzie. Looking Back to Move Ahead Germantown, OH: FBW, 1994.

Cheeks-Collins, Jennifer E. Black America Series: Madison County, Mississippi Charleston: Arcadia, 2002.

Townsend Davis, Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Mead, Carol Lynn. The Land Between Two Rivers: Madison County, Mississippi. Canton, MS: Friends of the Madison County—Canton Public Library, 1987.

Orr-Klopfer, M. Susan. Where Rebels Roost : Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited. (self-published) 2005.

Payne, Charles M. I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

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EVENTS

Voter Education Project in Madison

(1969) “Workshop Disruption in Madison Is Charged”

“The Voter Education Project Thursday charged that a voter workshop in Canton, Miss. was disrupted by a Madison County, Miss. deputy sheriff.

The Atlanta-based organization, which said the incidence occurred Wednesday, called on the U.S. Justice Department to launch an investigation and “put an immediate end to voting rights violations.”

A statement issued by the VEP charged that a deputy sheriff confiscated a voting machine which was being demonstrated to newly-registered black voters. It said the voter education workshop was being conducted by VEP field representatives using audio-visual techniques and that the session was coordinated by a local black elected official Mrs. Flonzie Goodloe, a member of the local election commission.

The statement said that Mrs. Goodloe had received approval and permission from the election board on Sept. 24 to use the election machine in the workshop and that a notice of the public meeting was printed in a local newspaper.

Madison County has been the scene of continued harassment, intimidation, and disruption as local whites and even public officials have sought to deny the vote to black citizens, charged VEP Executive Director John Lewis.

Madison County officials were not immediately available for comment on the charge.”

Sources:

Unknown Atlanta paper, 1965.

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GROUPS

The Klan of Madison Co.

During Reconstruction, President Andrew Johnson sent a militia of approximately 100 blacks with a white captain to Canton. While the soldiers were there, the city marshal found it necessary to jail several of the men for drunkenness. When the other black soldiers heard of it, they demanded the release of their comrades. The jailer refused their demand, and the black soldiers beat him to death and released those who were jailed.

White vengeance for that violence was not long in coming. As they drilled in the courthouse square, they were attacked and overpowered by Klansmen. Black soldiers, both dead and alive, were loaded onto a freight car bound for the North. Because of such incidents, black soldiers were recalled from duty in the South.

In the confrontation between the Klansmen and the black soldiers, one Klan member –Hugh Lawson- was killed. The black man who shot Lawson was sentenced to life, but never made it to jail.

Sources:

Brown-Wright, Flonzie. Looking Back to Move Ahead Germantown, OH: FBW, 1994.

Cheeks-Collins, Jennifer E. Black America Series: Madison County, Mississippi Charleston: Arcadia, 2002.

Townsend Davis, Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Mead, Carol Lynn. The Land Between Two Rivers: Madison County, Mississippi. Canton, MS: Friends of the Madison County—Canton Public Library, 1987.

Orr-Klopfer, M. Susan. Where Rebels Roost : Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited. (self-published) 2005.

Payne, Charles M. I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

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DOCUMENTS

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