Hinds

PEOPLE

Shirley, Dr. Ollye

drollyeshirleyDr. Ollye Shirley was an accomplished leader in public television, children's programming and advocacy, civil rights activism, public education, community service, and more. She and her late husband, Dr. Aaron Shirley, were paragons of civil rights in Mississippi. (Photo: Dr. Shirley is in the center.)

Read more


PLACES

WLBT Television

On April 15, 1965, the Office of Communication of the United Church of Christ petitioned the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to deny renewal of Lamar Life Insurance Company's broadcast license to operate WLBT. The petition was filed on the grounds that the station had failed to serve Jackson's African American community, which constituted 40% of its viewers at the time. It was the first such petition ever filed by a national religious denomination in news and program content, and lack of African American entertainers. Portions of the documentation for the petition were secretly prepared by progressive white women. Lamar Life Insurance Company eventually lost its broadcast license to Communications Improvement, Inc., a company with 91% African American ownership; it assumed operation of WLBT in June 1971 and hired William H. Dilday as the station's first African American manager.

Sources:

"Civil Rights Driving Tour of Hinds County"produced by the Associated Press, Tougaloo College, the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, and the Mississippi Development Authority (Tourism Division).

Read more


EVENTS

Lynch Street Shooting

On May 14, 1970, a protest among Jackson State students erupted on Lynch Street. Just ten days before, four students protesting the Vietnam War were killed in Ohio at Kent State by National Guardsmen. Partially in response to the deaths at Kent State and partially in response to a fallacious rumor that Charles Evers, brother of slain NAACP leader Medgar Evers, had been killed, students began rioting on Lynch Street. Several reports were made to the police department regarding fires, overturned vehicles, thrown rocks, and gunfire. National Guardsmen and police officials blocked off a section of Lynch Street and several surrounding blocks. After quelling a fire at Stewart Hall, a men’s dormitory, a group of policemen proceeded to the Alexander Center, a women’s dormitory. At Alexander the officers encountered between 75 and 100 protesters and opened fire. The gunshot volley killed Phillip Gibbs, a pre-law major, and James Green, a Jim Hill High School student, and wounded eleven others. No evidence of a sniper was ever found. Some of the chipped concrete is still visible on the west end of Alexander Hall. The Lynch Street shooting was the topic of Congressional probe and received considerable attention from President Nixon’s Commission on Campus Unrest. Today a memorial marker to Phillip L. Gibbs and James Earl Green is in place at the Alexander Center.

Sources:

http://www.may41970.com/Jackson%20State/jackson_state_may_1970.htm

“Civil Rights Driving Tour of Hinds County”produced by the Associated Press, Tougaloo College, the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, and the Mississippi Development Authority (Tourism Division).

Read more


GROUPS

Tougaloo Child Development of Mississippi

Formerly located on this site was a house owned by Mrs. Annie Smith. Mrs. Smith was instrumental in founding the Tougaloo Center of the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM) around 1965. The Child Development Group of Mississippi was one of the nation’s pioneer Head Start programs.

Sources:

“Civil Rights Driving Tour of Hinds County”produced by the Associated Press, Tougaloo College, the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, and the Mississippi Development Authority (Tourism Division).

Read more


DOCUMENTS

{phocadownload view=category|id=75|text=Click HERE to enter the Hinds County Document Library|target=p}

(more…)